NV centers in diamond

The nitrogen-vacancy center, or NV center, is one of the numerous point defects in diamonds. Because NV centers are photoluminescent, they can be detected easily, especially in the negative charge state (NV−). Spin states in NV centers are a promising candidate for a room-temperature qubit platform for quantum computers.

Nv centers

NV centers are defects in the diamond crystal lattice. Each defect act as if a single fluorescing atom is already trapped in its lattice.

An NV center in a diamond typically absorbs light between 450 nm and 650 nm and emits light in the 600 nm to 800 nm range. The electronic spin-state of this atom-like defect can further be manipulated by applying a magnetic field, electric field, microwave radiation or light, or a combination, resulting in sharp resonances in the intensity and wavelength of the photoluminescence.

Operation at room temperature

Since NV centers can be stably operated at room temperature, spin states in NV centers are a promising candidate for a room-temperature qubit platform for quantum computers.

The simple excitation of an NV center can be accomplished by any single wavelength in the 450 nm to 650 nm region. There is still a lot we do not understand about the electronic states, and researchers investigate the fluorescence dynamics of the absorption and emission regions.

Use a broadband tunable laser

Addressing the entire wavelength region from 450 nm to 650 nm is not easy with conventional lasers. Many researchers rely on supercontinuum light sources, like our tunable SuperK CHROMATUNE or SuperK FIANIUM, to get tunability across the entire region and perfect beam quality.

References

We are part of the European Quantum Flagship, the European Quantum Industry Consortium, the Quantum Economic Development Consortium, and the Danish Quantum Community.